With the large number of soybean acres where residue was baled this year, we’ve received questions as to why the soybean residue is being baled and the value of that residue. This article answers the specific questions we’re receiving. Like other crop residues, soybean residue is used for livestock. Some use it for bedding as it isn’t as palatable as other crop residues. Others shred and mix it with distiller’s grains for livestock feed or use it as roughage if it is sold at a lower price than corn residue (and is available). There may be several reasons why we’ve seen an increase in baling of soybean residue this year. While we aren’t deficient in corn residue, the late harvest delayed baling of corn residue for some. Another factor may have been higher hay prices this fall that have only increased since. Livestock producers may have been looking for a forage alternative and crop growers may have been looking for some extra income. In general, the amount of crop residue produced is related to grain production. Approximately 1 ton of crop residue (at 10% moisture) is produced with 40 bushels of corn or grain sorghum (56 lb/bu at 15.5%), 30 bushels of soybean, and 20 bushels of w...